Rapier Lesson September 25, 2009

by Kevin | September 25th, 2009

For the next month, I’m going to be traning pretty heavily for the Prima Spada of Cynagua tournament, on November 1st.

On the conditioning side, I’m going to be roller blading to work and back for the rest of the time I’m at my job (about 20 minutes), and after that at least a 20 minute run or skate twice a day. I’m also going to attend the DFA footwork and conditioning classes twice a week. Puck and I are going to do lessons starting twice a week and increasing in frequency to every day towards the end.

Today was our first lesson together in about a month and we got a lot of reps in. All actions were done with the dagger closing the line during the lunge.

  1. From master’s invitation in 3rd straight thrust on command
  2. In time as master changes from engagement in 4th to invitation in 3rd, straight thrust.
  3. From master’s engagement in 3th, disengagement.
  4. In time, as master attempts to engage in 3th, disengagement
  5. From master’s invitation in 4th, straight thrust on command
  6. In time as master changes engagement in 3th to invitation in 4rd, straight thrust.
  7. From the master’s engagement in 4th, disengagement.
  8. In time, as master attempts to engage in 4th, disengagement
  9. In time as master changes from the invitation in 3rd to the invation of 2nd, Student finds the blade in 4th, glide to the body
  10. In time as master changes from the invitation in 3rd to the invation of 2nd, Student finds the blade in 4th, glide to the body, instructor executes a poor parry of 4th, first form of the renewed attack with a forced glide and an appel.
  11. In time as master changes from the invitation in 3rd to the invation of 2nd, Student finds the blade in 4th, glide to the body
  12. In time as master changes from the invitation in 3rd to the invation of 2nd, Student finds the blade in 4th, instructor retreats, second form of the renewed attack with a forced glide.
  13. In time as master changes from engagement in 4th to invitation in 3rd with a retreat, straight thrust to the crook of the arm
  14. In time as master changes from engagement in 3th to invitation in 4rd with a retreat, straight thrust to the crook of the arm.
  15. In time, as master attempts to engage in 3th and retreats, disengagement to the crook of the arm.
  16. In time, as master attempts to engage in 4th and retreats, disengagement to the outside wrist.
  17. In time as master changes from engagement in 4th to invitation in 3rd, feint direct and disengagement to the body
  18. In time, as master attempts to engage in 3th, feint by disengagement and disengagement to the wrist
  19. In time as master changes from engagement in 3th to invitation in 4rd, feint direct and disengagement to the body
  20. In time, as master attempts to engage in 4th, feint by disengagement and disengagement to the wrist
  21. In time, find the sword in 4th, feint direct and disengagement to the body
  22. In time, find the sword in 4th, feint direct and passata soto
  23. In time, find the sword in 3th, feint direct and disengagement to the body
  24. In time, find the sword in 4th, feint direct and disengagement to the wrist
  25. In time, as instructor attempts to engage in 3rd, feint by disengagement and disengagement to the wrist
  26. In time, find the sword in 3th, feint direct and disengagement to the wrist
  27. In time, as instructor attempts to engage in 4rd, feint by disengagement and disengagement to the wrist
  28. In time, find the sword in 4th, straight thrust, instructor parries 4th and reatreats. 2nd form of the renewed attack with a feint by disengagement and disengagement
  29. Puzzle: 25, but instructor does hand parry to the outside low line and attacks with hand in 2nd to the high inside.
  30. Solution 1: add to 25, a counter parry with the dagger to the high inside and repost low.
  31. Solution 2: add to 25 a counter parry with the dagger to the high outside and repost low, with passata soto. (fails)
  32. Good solution: add to 25, an appuntata to the high inside line with dagger closure and an inquartata.
  33. In time, find the sword in 4th, straight thrust, instructor parries 4th and reatreats. 2nd form of the renewed attack with a feint by disengagement and disengagement, instructor parries executes a hand parry to the low outside and reposts to the high line, student does appuntata to the high indside with the dagger and inquartata.
  34. Instructor’s choice, instructor will fail at any one of the 3 parries, and student must hit anyway.
  35. From instructor’s invitation in 3rd, three straight thrusts EOL.

This was a really fun and almost hour long lesson. My arm was almost completely dead afterward.  As mentioned above, all attacks were done with dagger opposition. Further Puck would occasionally throw a “hook” to attempt to get around the dagger, so I needed to close more. The last set of actions was posed as puzzle to solve, and I went through a number of failed attempts to get it right. Do you have a better solution?

feint by disengagement and disengagement to the wrist

2 Responses to “Rapier Lesson September 25, 2009”

  1. Ok…trying to visualize what this would look like against another left handed fencer…

    What about a second disengagement to elude the hand parry?

    Or turning your last action into a cut that will hit their hand and teach them a lesson for their impertinance?

    Maybe pick up the parry with your dagger to the outside high line, then follow through with a passing step, finishing with either a pommel strike to the face or a circular cut to the head?

    Sounds like a fun lesson. Glad you had a good time!

  2. We’ll have to try these out at crown. I found that eluding the hand parry was hard since it’s meant as a last minute action. I found that i could feint around the hand if I knew it was coming, but couldn’t if it was well timed.

    The problem with cuts is that the dagger counter parry gets in the way, since you have to uncross the weapons. The pommel strike could work though.

    Honestly the best answer I found is the dagger counterparry, but the inquartata is so much cooler looking, and it lets you run away from the action.

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I am a fencing coach at Davis Fencing Academy, the Epee coach for the UC Davis Fencing Club, and an historical fencer. I hold a Provost at Arms certificate from the San Jose State Fencing Masters Program.

This blog contains my musings on historical fencing, and a record of private lessons given to my students.

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